(108) Montrose-Scurdie Ness Circuit (Angus)

Route Summary
A good coastal walk with fine views over the Port of Montrose and the mouth of the River South Esk. Scurdie Ness lighthouse is in an attractive setting. Cattle are typically encountered at one point, so consider if the complete circular route is suitable for you and your family.

Duration: 2 hours.

 

Route Overview
Duration: 2 hours.
Transport/Parking: Montrose has good rail and bus links. Check timetables. There is a small car-park at the the walk start/end point on Rossie Square.
Length: 5.340 km / 3.34 mi
Height Gain: 75 meter.
Height Loss: 75 meter.
Max Height: 36 meter.
Min Height: 2 meter.
Surface: Very rough in places, otherwise, good. Mostly on tarred surfaces and firm coastal grassy paths (not well-defined). However, the short section close to Waypoint 4 at Mains of Usan Farm may be very muddy and rough, caused by cattle hooves. Note warning about encountering cattle, including cows with calves, in the Waypoint 3 description!
Difficulty: Medium (see Surface).
Child Friendly: You will likely encounter cattle between Waypoint 3 and 4. So, consider if this walk is suitable for your children.
Dog Friendly: You will likely encounter cattle between Waypoint 3 and 4. So, consider if this walk is suitable for your dog. Due to meeting farm animals and walking on public roads, keep dogs under strict control and on lead at all times throughout this walk.
Refreshments: Diamond Lil’s pub/restaurant close to the walk start/end point on Brownlow Place. Options in Montrose.

Description
This is an interesting and visually stimulating little walk from the old fishing village of Ferryden, near the Port of Montrose, on the southern bank of the River South Esk, to the attractive lighthouse at windswept Scurdie Ness. On the initial outward section there are a number of information boards about Ferryden, WWII defences, navigation aids at the treacherous river mouth, and, finally, about the lighthouse itself. It is believed there has been a trading port here since at least the creation of the royal burgh of Montrose in the 12thC. Today it is a busy modern port providing services for the North Sea energy industry and general maritime transport. Scurdie Ness Lighthouse was built in 1870 by David & Thomas Stevenson. The lighthouse is a tall white tower 39 metres high, and is listed as a building of architectural/historic interest. Our circular walk continues along the attractive low-lying grassy coastline south of the lighthouse to Mains of Usan Farm, before returning on quiet minor country roads to Ferryden. Unfortunately, you are very likely to encounter grazing cattle in this section of the walk. A sign warns that there may be cows with calves, so it is important to keep well clear of any cattle encountered (you may feel more comfortable carrying a walking pole). You must also consider if this section is suitable for children or dogs. Please keep any accompanying dogs under close control and on lead! Nearing the field gate at Waypoint 4 (Mains of Usan Farm) it should also be noted that the ground conditions may be very uneven and muddy. At the Farm, you have the option of extending the walk southwards along the coastline, either to Seatown of Usan (adding 3 km overall), or to Elephant Rock (adding 6 km overall). In both cases, you may take quiet minor roads to connect back to this route. Of course, for a much shorter walk, you have the option of re-tracing your steps from Scurdie Ness lighthouse directly back to Ferryden. See:
https://visitangus.com/montroseport/
https://www.nlb.org.uk/lighthouses/scurdie-ness/ and https://www.walkhighlands.co.uk/angus/ferryden.shtml

Links:
Photos from walk
Download Route Guide  (PDF with illustrated Waypoints)
Download GPX file  (GPS Exchange Format)
Access Walk on Viewranger
Access Walk on Wikiloc

 

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